Look at us laugh. Look at us lie.

Welcome to the end of White Cat Week, Reachers. White Cat’s pages have flown by me once more, and once more I have fallen in love with Cassel Sharpe. So what else is new? We’re pretty much always in love with him, around here.

It’s been a fun week. Snifferblog and 2 AM Readers both joined me this week (thanks guys!) and both of them had some lovely things to say about the book that I so generously forced upon offered to them.

Mariesa from 2 AM summed up our fearless leader quite well this morning:

Cassel

somewhat. vaguely. good job cassel.

“Coffee stained” indeed, as Cassel Sharpe consumed 12 individual cups of coffee and 1 whole pot (in one evening) over the course of this book. He may die of caffeine overdose before the next book is out, honestly. We’re all kind of worried about him.

Our old friend Snifferblog somehow managed to get along with this book as well, even given its feline heritage. He wrote a super intriguing review about it and everything.

And then there’s me.

So I read in my new Simon and Schuster misprint this time, and somehow ended up doing a vague job of annotating, keeping count of Cassel’s coffee intake and making notes to no one in particular.

My handwriting is almost as messy as Cassel’s life, but here’s a few of my favorites:

12714018_672255772877837_2035752218_n

 

(“Honestly, it’s a wonder Cassel survived past age five, what with the combination of smart mouth and horrible brotherly love he’s got going on.”)

 

12650573_672255752877839_301113907_n

He’s totally fine.

 

 

 

Cassel “I’m fine with showering alongside arachnids” Sharpe. As one does.

And finally, a decent summary of the whole entire book:

12714441_672255739544507_1855219908_n

He does try. He tries very hard. He tries to be good, he tries to think straight, he tries to exist without copious amounts of caffeine…

Okay, maybe not that last one.

But in almost every other aspect of his life, Cassel Sharpe tries very, very hard.

And I think that continues to be one of my favorite parts of these books. In a post a while ago, I talked about Cassel in correlation to his setting, and that still stands quite firmly.

Cassel is a product of his circumstances and places, his family, his setting, his genre. But he is also a mess of his own making, and that is what makes him special.

And so here we are on day one of RED GLOVE WEEK. Have fun, tweet lots, and I’ll see you on the 14th with more coffee stats.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Look at us laugh. Look at us lie.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s